YOUTH ASPIRATIONS AND THE FUTURE OF WORK

YOUTH ASPIRATIONS AND THE FUTURE OF WORK
September 29, 2020 dmh

An International Labour Orgnaisation (ILO)

Literature and Evidence Review

by Drew Gardiner and Micheline Goedhuys

So looking forward to hearing more about this new ILO paper and very latest global trends and developments from Pedro Moreno da Fonseca, Technical Specialist, ILO on 23rd October 2020 at our forthcoming Virtual International Conference

The ILO paper above highlights poverty, despair and precariousness are commonly understood to deprive young people of significant opportunities, experiences and even freedom. The effects of poverty can extend beyond economic opportunities and deprive young people of their aspirations and leave psychological scars. And especially in the context of the massive current and future changes in labour markets around the world, a vitally important question is whether it is possible to enhance the beliefs and aspirations of young people – even those most economically marginalized – in a way that helps them overcome what life throws in their path?

The solution – if it is possible to influence beliefs and aspirations in such a way as to lead to higher levels of labour market attainment, then appropriate policies can be developed. As confirmed by recent trends analysis, young people in particular remain disadvantaged in the labour market. The transition from school to work is increasingly difficult, with the latest data putting the global youth unemployment rate at 13.6 per cent in 2020. Three out of four young workers are employed in the informal economy, especially in the developing parts of the world. Informal employment is one of the main factors behind a high incidence of working poverty among young people.

According to International Labour Organization (ILO) estimates, more than a fifth of young people are not in employment, education or training, three-quarters of whom are women. Compounding this situation is the fact that the world of work is changing rapidly, with technological and climate change altering the conditions of production and labour markets undergoing substantial shifts. The transformation of employment relations, expanding inequalities and economic stagnation greatly hamper the achievement of full employment and decent work for everyone.

Interested to hear your views email: admin@dmhassociates.org

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